Paradise Era

From the first installment of my third global warming science fiction novel “Last Week” I posted yesterday:

She had made it safely to her destination. 21st Century New York, still in the Paradise Era. That was the good news.

The bad news was that she would have only one last week to live. The effect of the time machine was limited to this one week. After that, she would just disappear without trace from the 21st Century World.

So the basic idea is that my protagonist, Princess Angel from the 24th Century, comes back into our time with a one-way time machine. And she gets only one last week to live in the deal.

Why would anyone want such a deal? And what do I mean with “Paradise Era”?

Well, I happen to think that if one could choose in what time one would want to live, the late 20th and early 21st Centuries would be an excellent choice.

That’s because humanity is working through 5,3 million years worth of fossil fuel each year. It takes 5.3 million years to accumulate the fossil fuel we are burning in one year. That has some fortunate consequences for living standards in developed countries. Life is much better on average than in about any previous century. That’s the least we can expect while overspending our resources by a factor of over five million.

It has some unfortunate consequences for future generations living in the 24th Century, though (if there is anyone living then). For one, the fossil fuel reserves will be gone. And all the CO2 from burning them will cause massive global warming problems.

That, in turn, will make it an attractive idea for many people in the 24th Century to get back to the past, even if that means they will die after one week.

Anyway, that’s the basic idea. You’ll have to wait 300 years to see if it turns out to be true.

 

Published by kflenz

Professor at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo. Author of Lenz Blog (since 2003, lenzblog.com).

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