Another Way to Use Energy in the Desert: Suck Up CO2

Paul Gipe just posted an article looking back at his three decades of renewable advocacy titled “100 Percent Renewable Vision Building”.

In that article Gipe describes how reality has performed much better than what was expected decades ago. And now we are discussing 100 percent renewable.

That is a great article, and I recommend reading it.

But it also gave me a new idea.

One of the problems with building large scale renewable energy projects in the desert is that you need long power lines connecting the desert sites to the World’s cities. Those need time and cost money.

So I have been looking for alternatives before, and I have come up with some, like transporting quicklime or making silicon.

Another one would be to use the energy right in the desert to suck up CO2 from the atmosphere. It can be done already with present technology, and interest in doing that will increase a lot over the coming decades, once the damages from global warming become even higher than the $1.2 TRILLION a year right now.

I’m bringing this up because to get 100% renewable energy with intermittent sources, you need much more than 100% of peak capacity installed. Which leads to lots of time slots where you get much more than 100% of demand. One way to use the excess energy is extracting CO2 from the atmosphere. And the nice thing about that is that it doesn’t matter where you do the extracting. Any desert site will do.

Obviously, there needs to be a steady income stream from CO2 cleanup, and it needs to cover the costs. That is a problem that would have to be solved one way or another.

But the point of this post is just to note this idea for further reference later on. It is one more way of using energy right in the desert without a grid in place.

 

Published by kflenz

Professor at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo. Author of Lenz Blog (since 2003, lenzblog.com).

One thought on “Another Way to Use Energy in the Desert: Suck Up CO2

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: